Deciding to move a parent or loved one into a nursing home can be very difficult. However, if you know that you personally can no longer provide the standard of care and support your loved one requires for their own safety and health, you might think moving to a professional facility will be in their best interests.

Unfortunately, the staff in nursing homes may neglect certain residents, which could result in unnecessary injuries and illnesses. Pressure ulcers, in particular, are a condition that proper care and support can usually prevent.

Pressure ulcers develop due to long periods of immobility or topical pressure

If you have ever had to stay seated for several hours and then felt burning or tingling in your legs after you finally stand up, you have an idea of how pressure ulcers, also known as bedsores, start to form.

A person left in the same position for long amounts of time can eventually develop a pressure ulcer as a result of that continued external pressure. People confined to their beds may develop pressure ulcers under their shoulder blades and hips as well as on the back of their heels and on their head. The longer someone goes without care and proper movement, the worse their bedsores can become.

Staff should be proactive and consider pressure ulcers in their care plan

Nursing home staff should pay close attention to the parts of the body that have regular pressure in residents with limited mobility. They should frequently check areas that handle significant pressure when sitting or lying down to monitor for early signs of bedsore development. Foam support, frequent rotation and other steps can reduce pressure on at-risk areas.

If a loved one has developed serious bedsores or if any issue with bedsores isn’t addressed after you bring it to the attention of their caregivers, it’s time to take action to protect your loved one. An experienced attorney can provide valuable guidance.