In 2010 a Florida abortion provider committed an egregious act of medical malpractice. The male doctor was treating a patient pregnant with twins, one of whom had Down syndrome. The mother made the difficult decision to abort the baby with Down syndrome, but the procedure ended up killing the other baby. After losing his medical license, based on his medical malpractice in this case, as well as other instances of “shoddy” work, the man was hospitalized in a local mental health facility after the threatened to commit suicide.

As grievous as the incident was, it is not the only instance of a doctor aborting the wrong twin. Last month, a mother submitted to an abortion of a twin in an Australian hospital. She based her decision on information she received from her doctor that one of her babies had a diminished chance of survival due to a congenital heart defect. A technician was said to have checked on the position of the healthy baby three times before the procedure. However, chemicals meant to end the life of the ill baby were injected into the healthy one, thus killing him or her. The woman then had to endure an emergency Cesarean section to have the sick baby removed.

While the Royal Woman’s Hospital has acknowledged its error, friends of the woman say she “went into the hospital with two babies” and was left with none.

Sadly, cases like these are making headlines not only here in the United States, but all over the world. One shudders to think of the pain and suffering the mothers and other family members have endured. Additionally, the cases have brought the public spotlight on private medical decisions. Whatever one feels about the appropriateness of abortion in these circumstances, no reasonable person would applaud the botched medical procedures that created unfathomable suffering.

The simple fact is medical malpractice consists of virtually every conceivable act of negligent medical care. Florida residents who have suffered from negligent or even reckless treatment from doctors or hospitals have the legal right to do something about it. In these cases, no one can bring the deceased babies back to life, but the wrongdoers can be held fully accountable for their mistakes as a means of ensuring that similar errors will not go unpunished.

Source: The Life News, “Hospital Kills “Wrong” Twin in Abortion, Both Babies Now Dead,” Steven Ertelt, Nov. 23, 2011